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l_santhosh
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Joined: 16 Oct 2002
Posts: 143

PostPosted: Tue Oct 10, 2006 3:35 am Reply with quoteBack to top

Recently, one of my relatives, who has been living in Bangalore for many years, said that our community's name is not in the list of communities under the BC category. Infact, it is not mentioned under any of the categories.
What this means is that his children will have to secure admissions in colleges(starts from PUC) under the open category. This clearly puts them at a disadvantage.

When most other communities(he mentioned a few) in Karnataka are recognised in Tamilnadu(and vice-versa) under the appropriate/ relevant categories, why is our community not in the BC list?
The reason can only be attributed to ignorance of the government authorities(as in most cases) or indifference on the part of our Badaga associations.

With more and more of our people likely to settle here in the near future, this issue should be taken up on priority.

BBA, listening?
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melursenthil
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Joined: 03 May 2006
Posts: 57

PostPosted: Tue Oct 10, 2006 10:04 pm Reply with quoteBack to top

Dear Santhosh,

I have been brought up entirely in Karnataka and have never used the certificate of backward caste since our community is not in big numbers in Karnataka.

It is not easy to get the tag of a backward community when we are no political force there.

By the way we are capable of gettomg admissions without the tag and we should not get bogged down by the tag

Regards
Senthil

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kausalya
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Joined: 27 Mar 2004
Posts: 90

PostPosted: Tue Oct 17, 2006 11:40 am Reply with quoteBack to top

I perfectly agree with Senthil Anna.
I have been in bangalore all my life and did my complete education here thru general category.
Caste based reservations shud not be a reason.
If the marks are gud, y worry?
We have the capability. Lets move on.

Regards
Kausalya

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naveen_sankaran
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Joined: 26 Jun 2004
Posts: 25
Location: Bangalore Karnataka

PostPosted: Tue Oct 17, 2006 11:23 pm Reply with quoteBack to top

Similar thoughts here.
I studied in Maharashtra. There is no reservation for Badagas there either. Moreover, I didn't think any of the few badagas we knew there really deserved reservation. Almost all of them had a decent financial/social background.
And as far as I have seen in Bangalore/Karnataka, I think the situation is the same here. (Please correct me if I am wrong)
IMO, it may amount to misuse if a well-to-do badaga guy/girl availed reservation.

If anyone needs reservation, it has to be our brothers/ sisters back in our hatties who lack the financial resources/ exposure.

Regards
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bhojvija
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Joined: 29 Mar 2007
Posts: 5

PostPosted: Thu Jun 14, 2007 4:24 am Reply with quoteBack to top

U people are in cities and u r doing/completed education in cities. I can say you people are above the middle class family and for you it’s not at all a matter. We have to talk about our entire badaga community. For example an SC/ST guy simply getting govt job if he passed just degree. And one bigger thing is for them government providing more facilities like scholarship, free hostel, books, notebooks etc… In our community so many peoples are stopped their education due to lack of economical problem and their entire life style also has been changed in terms of labors etc…. Just we have to think from their side. My suggestion is we should/must not lose our facilities.
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l_santhosh
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Joined: 16 Oct 2002
Posts: 143

PostPosted: Fri Jun 15, 2007 3:31 am Reply with quoteBack to top

When I started this thread, the aim was to make use of the current reservation status in Bangalore
by people who would prefer to make use of it.
It is another irrelevant opinion that I am all for economic-status based reservation.
But from the opinion of some and the lack of it from others in this thread, it is clear they were not interested in it.

'bhojvija'(Bhojan?/ Vijay?) has a slightly different point of view...
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bjaypee
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Joined: 01 Aug 2001
Posts: 198

PostPosted: Wed Jun 20, 2007 7:19 pm Reply with quoteBack to top

I have very strong views on this subject. Before I elaborate on them, I feel that we should first of all be identified as BADAGAS which is not the case as SANTHOSH has rightly mentioned in the beginning.". . our community's name is not in the list of communities under the BC category. Infact, it is not mentioned under any of the categories."

In a general sense, I also agree with the views of 'bhojvija' mentioned above.

Most of us feel that getting ST status is demeaning and meant mainly for getting admissions and getting jobs easily. The truth is entirely different.

Even in our own district of the Nilgirs, do you know that we are not taken as a separate community as BADAGAS but are clubbed with others??? That is one of the reasons why the exact number of Badags is not available? When census is taken Badags are clubbed under Kannadigas.

I am afraid , if this status continues, after a few years we will come under the "extinct" community.

Being from an above average family - economically [God's grace], having done my professional studies of engineering and business administration etc and having served in the defence services and lived only in big cities like Delhi, Bangalore & Madras for the past forty odd years or educating my children in the elitist schools, colleges and now abroad, I had no occasion to seek the tag of BC.

But, that is a BIG BUT [no pun intended]...

BUT, NOW THAT I VISIT AND INTERACT WITH OUR PEOPLE IN OUR HATTIS ON A REGULAR BASIS, I AM CONVINCED THAT FOR THE UPLIFTMENT OF OUR COMMUNITY AS A WHOLE (as opposed to city based creamy layers) THERE IS AN URGENT NEED THAT :

1. First, we should be identified as a separate group as BADAGAS like Todas, Kothas,Kurumas etc when the people(tribes) of the Nilgiris are referred to.

2. For the larger good of the community , should get the ST status for the benefits available are too many to go into detail.


Nearly eighty years back, Nakku Betta Leader, Rao Bahadur (Rao Sahib then) Bellie Gowder on whose invitation the Governor of then Madras Province visited Hubbathalai Village was presented a memorandum on the Hill Tribes of Nilgiris which included Badagas, Todas & Kothas. In a grand cultural show organised on that event Badaga dance was presented in their 'DODDA KUPPACHA". Rao Bahadur Bellie Gowder, incidetally, represented as leader of all the tribes of Nilgiris (a relatively remote hilly & jungle area and unexplored at that time).
Image


More on this in http://badaga.wordpress.com/burning-issues [more photos]

I would request Badaga Activists like Melur Senthil to go deeper into this vital issue.

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deva_mathan
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Joined: 31 Dec 1998
Posts: 131

PostPosted: Tue Jul 17, 2007 11:34 pm Reply with quoteBack to top

Here is a piece of article I found Sharing with Members

THE MYTH OF BADAGA ORIGIN & MIGRATION
http://www.womenswriting.com/writerdetails.asp?writerid=109
The Badagas are one of the important indigenous peoples, and the largest single community in the Nilgiri Hills which nestle at a point where the rugged beauty of the Eastern Ghats merge with the wooded verdancy of the Western Ghats, in Tamilnadu. Since the Badagas have no script, their history has been documented in other languages (mostly English) by non-Badaga historians and anthropologists (mostly westerners). Since the Nilgiris formed part of the Mysore state domains till 1799, the question of the migrations of the Badagas to the Nilgiris, does not arise.
It is said that during the reign of Tipu Sultan, seven brothers and their sister were living in a village called Badagahalli on the Talaimalai Hills near Mysore. One evening as the sister, who was a ravishing beauty, was busy making preparations for the milking of the cows as usual, one of the calves broke loose from the tree to which she had tied it . Not finding anything handy with which to tie it again, she uncoiled her long, luxuriant hair and held the calf back with it, while her brother milked the cow.
Legend has it that Tipu Sultan was riding in the vicinity and was witness to this sight. He was captivated by the sister and wanted to marry her. The brothers, who were staunch Hindus, disguised themselves and their sister, and fled by night to the Nilgiris. Legend has it too, that when they reached River Moyar, which is the northernmost limit of the Nilgiri District, their pursuers started to close in on them. The family is said to have placed a ‘Shivalingam’ on the ground, and prayed before it. The river Moyar is then said to have parted, and the refugees to have crossed over, while their pursuers were drowned by the closing waters.
The distinctive dress of the Badaga women is said to be the disguise adopted by them in flight, and the tatt-ooing on their fore-heads and fore-arms, a measure taken to make them unattractive. Legend also has it that in their hurry, they forget to pickup a baby asleep in a cradle, and even today, as a reminder of that lapse, the more orthodox Badagas will not use a cradle for a baby. The brothers are said to have settled down near the present village of Bethelhada. After a short stay there, they separated and dispersed in different directions. The oldest brother told one of his younger brothers to follow a deer and build a village where it stopped. The younger brother followed his instructions and settled down in Kinnakorai, where the deer stopped. Another brother settled down in Koderi, yet another in Hubbathalai. These brothers where the founders of the Porangad division of the Badagas.
The establishing of three other ‘semais’ or divisions have interesting histories behind them. It is said that as one group of Badagas or Gowdas reached the Nilgiris, they took shelter in a forest and in their hurry to leave, left a baby behind, which crawled into a cave. A Toda who happened to pass by glimpsed the baby, and enticed it to came out, but it would not. He then went and brought his own child and sprinkled some roasted amaranth grains in front of it. As the Toda child started picking the grains, the Gowda baby joined him, and the Toda father brought him up and it is said that he is the founder of the ‘Thothanad’ division of the Badagas.
According to another account, two Gowda brothers arrived from Mysore and reached Nunthala. They were very hungry. The younger brother is said to have shot a pigeon, and to have roasted and eaten it, while the elder brother abstained. It is said that the vegetarian brother is the ‘Hethappa’, or ancestor of the Kundah Division of the Badagas, while the non-vegetarian brother, the founder of the Mekunad Division of the Badagas.
Badaga Henno, Sathiyada Manno
(Badaga Woman or Earth Mother)
The title is only a rough translation of Badaga woman-hood, for there is no exact English translation for Sathiya – the nearest words are blessed or divine. (‘Mannu’ means soil). The Badaga woman is the epitome of ‘Shakthi’, and many of their festivals, legends, ballads and folk – tales are centred around women. In fact, the chief festival of the Badagas, Hethai Habba, is centred around ‘Hethai’, a woman imbued with divine powers, and who was subsequently deified. It is significant that though the Badagas are a patriarchal society, their women are held in high esteem. The high status of Badaga women perhaps derives from three main factors – the absence of a dowry – system, divorce by mutual consent, and widow-re-marriage. There is no stigma attached to widows; in fact they are part of the mainstream community, and in the fore – front of auspicious functions like engagement and wedding coremonies. Also, there is the practice of ‘hengava nadathodu” - a tradition of giving a daughter / sister material, emotional and moral support throughout her life.
Traditional Badaga women are very hardworking, and are the mainstay of the family and the community. They till the soil, harvest the produce, collect fire – wood and water, and tend the cows, in addition to looking after their families. Since the Badagas have been mainly agriculturists, the Badaga women’s ethos is closely connected to the soil. In fact, even the proverbs of the Badagas evoke this ethos – for e.g : “Hennogiri, mannogiri” (A daughter’s / sister’s curse will turn the soil barren).
During the past 50 years, however, Badaga women have become educated by leaps and bounds, and many of them are doctors, lawyers, engineers, educationists, scientists, research scholars, journalists, social workers etc., living and working all over the world. Outstanding among them is Smt. Akkamma Devi, the first woman – graduate, and the first woman member of parliament in the Badaga community.

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bjaypee
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Joined: 01 Aug 2001
Posts: 198

PostPosted: Wed Jul 18, 2007 9:01 am Reply with quoteBack to top

Hello Devarajan,

This info already figures in the thread http://www.badaga.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=393 'The Myth of Badaga Origin & Migration...'
Quote:
lok_here writes "This is from womenswriting.com by Indu K Mallah right ? If not from womenswriting.com plz send me the source. I want to collect all the articles by Indu K Mallah. Check this out.
http://www.womenswriting.com/writerdetails.asp?writerid=109#1"


I have also given this information along with other imputs about "Badaga Origin' in http://badaga.wordpress.com/badagas-origin/ where I have said Indu K Mallah, a well known Badaga writer who has many publications, including a novel, to her credit, writes about ”Origin of the Badagas“
Image

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deva_mathan
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Joined: 31 Dec 1998
Posts: 131

PostPosted: Wed Jul 18, 2007 11:09 pm Reply with quoteBack to top

Thanks Wg Cmdr,

I happend to miss your previous writings

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